A word on doing work for “exposure:”

NO.

That’s it, just say NO.

If the work is sufficiently complex to require special skills (yours) then it’s of sufficient value to the client to get paid.

I recently went through this dance. A prospect got in touch via email (referral from various sources), then we did some phone tag, several conference calls, a ream or more of additional email, and then a meeting was arranged.

For me, it was a two-hour drive early in the morning (I’m a night owl) to a breakfast meeting in a diner. Got there, and things started downhill almost immediately. The client principal wasn’t in attendance even though she would have to approve any ‘deal.’ The talk quickly turned to my doing this for ‘exposure’ (sorry, No); then well “you do the design and if we like the design then you can bid on the job and if you’re the winner you get paid after the job is all done.”

NO.

Not playing that game… time to leave. They wanted a ‘ball-park’ figure; I gave them one, and then added that it would of necessity be much higher should they return in a few months – disgruntled people are much more difficult clients. When they told me it wasn’t likely, I wished them success – with all those other consultants they’d tracked down for this sort of work.

My exit was made in silence, at least from that group. I expect they’ll be back, and my answer will, for them, always be NO.

End result – I think I’m going to have to start charging for prospect meetings, especially if the prospect isn’t used to dealing with custom software.

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Having something to say..

Listening in the classrooms, it’s easy to hear the same old lament: the hard plight of the student, never appreciated for his/her own creativity, forced into the same ruts as followed by untold others.

Funny it is, then, when a class requires the student to create, to expound, to communicate, and the student turns to the professor and asks “But what shall I write?”

It’s difficult to create; far more so than it appears on the outside, especially when faced with a deadline. Performing on schedule requires discipline… and interests forged beyond the confines of social media or the platitudes of the textbook.

Phish story

Boy howdy this one was good… but not quite good enough.

The back story – I am teaching a class on Content Management Systems. To help support the class, I registered several domains using the course name and number… cisy222.net, .us, .org, .com.

Getting ready for the class I went ahead and configured a multisite WordPress installation on cisy222.net (hosted here on the spareparts box). After deciding to use siteground.com as the freeware hosting supplier for the course (they offer 3 months’ free service for students) I then moved cisy222.us over to siteground.

In order to move the domain over to siteground, I had to change the authoritative nameservers to siteground (common limitation on low-end hosting), and that generated a routine alert message from the registrar.

So far, so good.

Then came the phish, a day later. Disguised as a status alert message from the registrar, this suggested that the nameservers were being changed for a different (but related) domain: cisy222.net. Yikes! So I went and signed in to the registrar (not using the convenient link in the email) and everything looked fine.

So I went back and studied the email a bit.

It was a phish.

But well-executed, Russian in origin, reasonably convincing, and I could see it being successful in many cases.

Don’t ever ever EVER click the link in an email without careful study first. 

Updating the homepage

It finally was time — time to update the main site (homepage) of www.woodall.com, to make it mobile-friendly and modern.

When I started with the Internet the whole idea of a small consultancy having its own outpost on the web was avant-garde – I registered woodall.com in October 1995 and went live immediately, and in the summer of 1997 brought the hosting in-house, where it remains to this day.

The main site exists mostly as a tool repository – only about a dozen pages were ever in the ‘official’ linkage and there are dozens of pages reachable only by typing in the URLs directly… or from offsite links.¹ Keeping the main page updated hasn’t been a priority.

Then one fine January morning a note popped in on email – Google was going to start lowering my page scores because the site was not “mobile-friendly.” Ahem. Something must be done. And now, it is.

Expect to see various changes in the site layout and background photos as I experiment with what works best, but for now, there’s a new site out there. And it looks far better than the old.


¹ After examining the logs it’s clear there are only three of the ‘hidden’ pages still being accessed – so after a bit of legerdemain with mod_rewrite those items are now restored.

And now, the divergence…

There is now another ‘copy’ of this blog, which will of necessity drift in a somewhat different direction – created for the purpose of education, and hosted in-house on the all-new-shiny-faster-server… in particular, watch for the appearance to change.

This blog will continue onward as the “primary” site; especially for photography and general technical discussions.