When it isn’t spam, but isn’t wanted

About six weeks ago, I got an email reminding me of an appointment to have my Nissan Altima serviced.

I don’t have a Nissan Altima – figured it was some sort of scam (something new every day), and punted it into the trash.

Then I got another, this time for a Nissan Pathfinder. And more, for other Nissans (but mostly Altimas, Pathfinders and Sentras) – none of which I have.

The names on the accounts change, but the dealer is always the same – Robbie Woodall Nissan in Danville VA.

I suspect I know what’s happening; poorly-designed software at the dealership service desk demands an email address and the advisor is just using woodall@woodall.com without bothering to think that it might be a real address (In the 1980s pharmacy software demanded a date of birth even for cash customers so 11/11/11 became the popular birthdate).

But it is a real address – it’s my address – and the volume is growing. I forward a couple of the emails to the service manager down there but apparently he doesn’t read his email.

 

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2 thoughts on “When it isn’t spam, but isn’t wanted”

  1. Only you. Hahaha! This had me laughing. Now as a user experience designer I have to question, “poorly-designed software at the dealership service desk demands an email address “. How do we know it is poorly designed? Do we know the design choices that were made that require email to be able to make that judgement call? Sure it’s poorly designed to you and Robbie Woodall but without further investigation I am not sure we can come to that conclusion. =)

    1. I would suggest that any software which does not allow for an override on a non-critical field is poorly designed, or at least has not paid proper attention to the demographics of car purchasers. At the least, there should be a default “not-supplied” email address available for use, or a system flag for “no email supplied.”

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