Ink-stained rant

One of the tasks tonight was printing out student work; it needs to be printed so I can grade it and hand it back. Nowadays most students won’t print their own work… usually, I think, from the cost involved.

The big cost is ink. My usual printer for everyday use is a worn Epson Stylus C-120. It uses four colors but five cartridges -doubling up on black – and if I were to use Epson-brand ink, the cost for one set of cartridges would be about  $60. Each cartridge holds 12 ml of ink – thus Epson ink costs $1,000 per liter, or a bit less than $4,000 to the gallon. And you thought gasoline was high-priced?

I don’t use Epson inks. I print way too much to go that route.

For the first couple of years I used a CISS – Continuous Ink Supply System. This is a set of 5 cartridges with tubing which loops outside the printer to a set of tanks holding bulk ink. The cost of the CISS was $35 – for 100 ml of ink in each tank! Re-inking costs were about $30 per 500ml – far less than name-brand.

CISS systems expect to be used, a lot. Daily works best. Otherwise the inks slowly draw back down the supply lines into the tank. If the time between use is too great, the inks may clot up a bit at the feed end of the tanks… at which point it’s easier to pull the system out and replace it rather than fix it. Been there, done that. These inks are dye-based and not particularly stable, but work just fine for daily print work (mostly text).

For now, I’m using generic dye-filled cartridges bought on Amazon – the vendor name changes with each purchase, but on average I’m paying $1.25 per cartridge… everything is working fine, except the ‘status’ messages from the Epson printer driver software.

Epson’s printer drivers give a visual depiction of remaining ink; and a warning pop-up when the capacity is ‘low.’ What I’m finding out is that ‘low’ is… a marketing ploy as opposed to any sort of reality. Two days ago I got the pop-up, urging me to buy ink as I was ‘low’ on black. Earlier tonight when I started to print, the indicator was at the bottom, indicating imminent emptiness – or so it seemed. Two hundred and four pages later, the indicator is still at the bottom… and the black ink is still printing nice and strong.

Tsk tsk tsk.

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